Home Ed: 34: May/2009

Ed: 34: May/2009

Editorial: Washington and Jerusalem

President Obama has reportedly said he wishes to begin renewing peace progress by asking for a series of "concrete steps" as reciprocal "confidence-building measures". This is potentially fully congruent with Netanyahu's approach - especially in terms of his concentration on "reciprocity"

Scribblings: Indyk-ations

As readers may recall, the AIR published a review in March of Innocent Abroad: An Intimate Account of American Peace Diplomacy in The Middle East, by Dr. Martin Indyk... Having now read the book myself, I agree with most of what reviewer Jonathan Schanzer had to say

AIR New Zealand: Durban Dissent

Ever since I heard that a "Durban II" conference on racism was going to be held, I've watched with interest to see whether New Zealand would be involved and what sort of public dialogue might occur about our stance.

Debacle at Durban II

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's tirade on April 20 to the United Nations' Durban II "anti-racism" conference in Geneva should not have surprised anyone.

History in the making

We leave the UN precinct satisfied. The conference now seems totally undermined and Ahmadinejad has unwittingly alienated Iran from the rest of the nations. Our protest has worked both in the NGO hall and the plenary.

Top Heavies

The Middle East may be astir and the global economy ablaze, but Binyamin Netanyahu, since cobbling together his surprising coalition of opposites, has a measure of peace.

Bibi and Barack Can Unite

In Washington, a new president is reaching out to the Muslim world, including Iran. In Jerusalem, the new government represents the disillusionment of the Israeli public with 15 years of failed peace talks.

Essay: The Rebound

Jemaah Islamiah has for more than 15 years fought to transform Indonesia into an Islamist state. In recent years, its terrorist campaign has suffered setbacks. As Jemaah Islamiah regroups, it builds upon the experience of Middle East terrorist groups.

The Last Word: Racism and the UN

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and many others in the Iranian Islamist regime, are true believers. The hatred, the distortions of history, the religiously-sourced arrogance he spouted in Geneva was not a cynical political ploy as much as an expression of firmly held ideology.